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Ask me things!

Kyra. Twenty-something Alaskan (ask me about it! I've lived here most of my life, including five years in Barrow, the northernmost community in the US) with two English degrees who seems to be in a holding pattern waiting for life to start. Still thinking about going back to school...some more. The academic nerdery is strong with this one. (Undergrad thesis: werewolves. Grad thesis: vampires. Specifically, Dracula, Twilight, and rape culture.) Writer, reader, wannabe novelist, hopeful cynic, traveler (up to 15 countries! *fist pump*), Ravenclaw, Browncoat, Whovian (Ten will always be my Doctor), member of way too many other fandoms, Tom Hiddleston fan, proud geek and gamer girl, etc. (favorites include the Mass Effect, Portal, and Fallout series, and Red Dead Redemption). Politically conservative-to-moderate feminist (yes, it's possible). Living with clinical depression since at least 2004. Somewhere around the demisexual end of the asexual spectrum. Possibly a vampire.

Also, I'm kind of writing a novel because Tom Hiddleston has a stupid face.

You can find me in multiple elsewheres, in varying degrees of regularity: in my writing journal, mostly for fanfic and fanmixes; last.fm; Twitter; AO3; and Fallen London, where I misunderstood the character creation for some reason and picked the wrong gender, among others. I'm thestarvelingcat on PSN, which is mostly only relevant if you want to find me in Red Dead Redemption multiplayer, and 100indecisions on Steam, as well as at Playfire. I'm still in love with Star Wars: The Old Republic, and I play semi-regularly on the Harbinger server under several different characters.

I also run F Yeah Fireflies and F yeah Raspberries, which are...pretty much what they say on the tin, as well as another one for one of my novels-in-progress. Calli and I co-run Strangeness in the Proportion for a horror game we're trying to make and the Red Dead Redemption blog the gunslinger's lament.

Formerly visions-and-revisions.

Following

22 September 14

Don’t include Fantastic Genocide in your story

mosellegreen:

mosellegreen:

So, let’s criticize something about TDW that isn’t about Loki. Or, not mainly, though inevitably his story is part of it. Because there is so, so much else wrong with this movie. Like the Fantastic Racism and Guilt-Free Extermination and its Final Solution.

Teal deer version: Please don’t construct the damn story so that your hero has to commit genocide and genocide is a good thing.

Read More

Reblogging this because I want to link an essay by the great Cory Doctorow about basically the same thing. The author rigs the game so that the characters are forced, forced! to do terrible things for the greater good. 


http://www.locusmag.com/Perspectives/2014/03/cory-doctorow-cold-equations-and-moral-hazard/

I’m doing this all backwards because I haven’t read the original post yet, but that Cory Doctorow essay is amazing, and it perfectly pins down why I find those kinds of stories so creepy. Also why a lot of the brutal chain-of-command stuff in BSG made me incredibly uncomfortable, and why a lot of “but the character had to do that!” responses to criticism don’t work: yes, the character didn’t have much choice, but the author sure as hell did. (This is one of my main points in criticizing the Twilight books, actually—like, I don’t blame Bella for being human or the supernatural creatures for being supernaturally strong and fast; I blame Meyer for making those authorial choices and then going “well that’s just how it is!”)

Reblogged: mosellegreen

Posted: 6:45 AM

Let’s talk about Thor

mikkeneko:

I’ve let my thoughts on Loki run tl;dr a few times, but let’s not actually talk about Loki in this post. Let’s talk about Thor for a minute. Specifically, let’s talk about Thor’s first appearance on Earth in The Avengers.

image

Thor’s first scene is clearly meant to establish that Thor is a super-cool, bad-ass, butt-kicking sort of guy. He’s strong. He’s mad. He’s strongmad. He’s pissed off and looking to share the pain.  He’s here to kick ass and chew bubblegum, and he’s all out of fucks to give! And also bubblegum.

So, let’s ignore for the moment the entire first Thor movie wherein Thor started out as a bloodthirsty, hairtrigger-temper bully but was supposed to grow into a better, more mature man - an actual hero - by the end.  Let’s actually examine Thor’s actions in his establishing scene.

image

People have already pointed out, multiple times, the cognitive dissonance of Thor’s fight against Iron Man and Captain America. See, Thor had absolutely no way of knowing that Steve’s adamantium shield would protect him from Mjolnir. Had absolutely no way of knowing that Steve is enhanced by the super-soldier serum and can survive things that would kill an ordinary man. As far as Thor knows, he just brought the entire might of Mjolnir down on an ordinary mortal man with an ordinary metal shield. Which would have killed almost anybody else on Midgard.

Okay, but Thor is in the heat of battle here. He’s raging, his blood is high, he’s not thinking clearly. Steve just attacked him (sort of) and made himself a target. If someone’s pointing a weapon at you, you’re allowed to hit back, right? Busting into someone else’s home dimension, breaking into restricted paramilitary property and then attacking their security when they come after you is a completely reasonable response, right?

image

Of course right.

Thor probably felt really bad about it later, when he calmed down a bit and realized he just tried to straight-up murder a respected soldier on an alien realm that he’s trespassing on without invitation. Gee, it’s almost as if Thor didn’t learn anything at all from his last movie.

But let’s back up a bit before that.

image

In Thor’s first scene, he lands on the plane that the Avengers are using to transport Loki from Germany to the US. He enters the cabin, grabs Loki by the throat, and pulls them both out of the plane. They hit the ground below, Loki on his back and Thor on his feet, and Thor starts threatening him.

This scene actually got me curious as to how high, exactly, they are off the ground at this point. The movie doesn’t indicate it at all. So I went to everybody’s trusty source, Wikipedia, to research common flight altitudes. Apparently, most commercial aircraft fly at altitudes between 20,000 and 40,000 feet above ground. (Military flights are higher, going up to 60k or even 80k feet.) The shorter the flight, the lower the airplane is able to fly; long flights take higher altitudes to avoid crossing paths with shorter flights. Transatlantic flights usually fly at about 35,000 feet. If they’re traveling between Germany and America, they’re probably at least 30,000 feet up, unless they’re blatantly ignoring air safety laws (which we sure hope they’re not, since they’re outside of the US and in a country where SHIELD has no jurisdiction.) So, they’re pretty high up. At an absolute minimum they have to be at least 10,000 feet up (the minimum safe distance for avoiding terrain variation,) and since the terminal velocity for a human-shaped object is achieved after only 2,000 feet, the difference between 10 and 30 thousand is pretty irrelevant.

So, to recap: Thor breaks into the plane and immediately puts Loki in a painful, dangerous hold. Note that at this point, Loki has surrendered to SHIELD and is not resisting in any way. In fact, not only is he not resisting, he’s actually in restraints. His ability to fight back or defend himself in any way — even if he wasn’t perfectly aware how much stronger than him Thor is — is effectively nil. Then he threw him out of a very high drop onto solid ground — let’s remember that Thor can fly, while Loki in this universe has shown no indication that he’s able to do so.

Wow, Thor, is that how people roll in Asgard? Beating up unresisting prisoners? Super classy. Can you imagine the public reaction if, say, a member of the NYPD was caught on tape grabbing a restrained, nonviolent suspect, lifting them by the throat and throwing them out of a second-story window?

But when Thor does it it’s okay, because he’s a hero.

Besides, they’re Asgardians. They’re practically physical gods. A little thing like a drop from a plane isn’t going to hurt them. Well, apart from the fact that it obviously did hurt Loki, since we see that he’s limping and in pain throughout the next scene. But overall they’re fine, just a little bruised. Clearly this scene is meant to show us that Thor and Loki are especially tough and can’t be harmed by something as minor as a….

image

….thirty thousand feet straight down drop from a plane?

Oh.

So, putting this sequence of events side by side, what Loki does to Thor in this scene is the exact same thing that Thor already did to him half an hour ago in this very movie. It’s different because the movie says it’s different, that’s all. When Loki does it, it’s a blatant murder attempt meant to show how far Loki has descended into villainy. When Thor does it, it’s just to show how darn awesome he is. And then never mentioned again.

Because it’s okay for heroes to do these things, as long as you do them to villains, who deserve it.

You know, it’s kind of impressive that Joss Whedon, who deconstructed the idea of the might-makes-right bully hero in the character of Captain Hammer in Doctor Horrible’s Sing-a-long Blog would manage to play the same trope so unironically straight in The Avengers.

:((((((

The similarities between the quinjet scene and the helicarrier scene didn’t occur to me until I read this post, and yeah, that’s…a pretty good point. I mean, I think Thor was hanging onto Loki (by the shoulders, too, I believe—he does change his grip right before he jumps) until pretty much right before they hit the ground, so it could be argued that the method and intention behind the falls was totally different. But particularly considering Loki’s first fall into the Void and then Thor here grabbing him by the throat and jumping out of a plane, that kind of puts a real different spin on the scene in the helicarrier. Bit more of “well Thor let’s see how you like it” really.

Reblogged: mikkeneko

Posted: 5:19 AM

geritsel:

Liu Maochan - a Chinese painter with a touch of French impressionism à la Monmartre. Gorgeous.

Reblogged: mikkeneko

Posted: 3:52 AM

(Source: iron-bae)

Reblogged: erlkonigstochter

Posted: 2:26 AM

(Source: hlddlestcn)

Reblogged: pro-antagonist

21 September 14
avalonsangel:

pushculture:

fucklikeagod:



I’m in love with this gif. Everything about it. The rain drizzling. The candle flickering. The colors. I love it.

god this is so relaxing

Rather fond of the rain, if I’m to be honest…

i would love to read to this

Reblogging for the relaxing feels

avalonsangel:

pushculture:

fucklikeagod:

I’m in love with this gif. Everything about it. The rain drizzling. The candle flickering. The colors. I love it.

god this is so relaxing

Rather fond of the rain, if I’m to be honest…

i would love to read to this

Reblogging for the relaxing feels

Reblogged: pro-antagonist

Posted: 9:08 PM

In your opinion, what happen to Loki when he fell in to the void? Like, what did he experienced? (about the end of “Thor”)

I think he went like with everything else to… Joss Whedon and I discus it, to sort as… It was like the worst place imaginable. I think, he went to sort of all of the darkest recesses of the Universe, you know. I’m sure he had a brush with … several brushes with death. I think he run in to the shadiest characters you can find in the Nine Realms. I think he had to rely on his wits to protect himself. And it was really really really unpleasant, I think. Umm… and all I have to, you know, I don’t have any frame of reference for that, really, except for a imagining what it might be like to be…, I don’t know, to be kidnapped by sort of a terrorist cell or something. And have to survive very very frightening and precarious existence. But whatever it was, it was important when Loki came back for the Avengers. Whatever compassion he had left, was absolutely kind a shriveled to a minimum. Because of the experience he had. Harrowing, I think, and scarring for life. In a way that Odin and Thor, and Frigga find very very difficult to understand. It’s a good question. Happy Birthday.

Tom Hiddleston - live on stage Q&A: Popcorn Tax.i October 8, 2013, Event Cinemas George Street, Sydney

(via hettolandija)

You have to love the way Marvel openly admits their Big Bad has gone through stuff their heroes couldn’t survive in their worst nightmares… but they still insist the fact it broke him makes him an irredeemable villain. Really, Joss Whedon?

(via coneycat)

Sometimes I think rather despairingly that maybe my theories about what happened to Loki in the Void are largely tinhatting, the result of spending the vast majority of my MCU time in kind of a fandom echo chamber, and I try to resign myself to the idea that the writers might well ignore all indications to the contrary and reveal that Loki’s partnership with Thanos was a willing one and in fact he’s still working for him. And then I remember, well, Whedon did write in things like Loki looking sick and stumbling after emerging from the portal and “he will make you long for something as sweet as pain,” and Tom compared Loki’s experiences to being kidnapped by terrorists, and then I feel a little better because at least there really is a reasonable amount of room for an alternate interpretation. Not that this is terribly reassuring, because the MCU writers have repeatedly shown a willingness to sacrifice characterization and internal consistency for explosions and laughs, but at least it makes me feel less delusional. 

I mean, my dearest hope for the MCU is that it will be explicitly revealed that Loki was forced to work with Thanos in one way or another, and all the Good Guys(TM) feel fairly awful when they learn this, and then Loki teams up with them to defeat Thanos. Bonus points if a lot of Loki’s actions in Avengers, which really don’t seem to have been thought through well even though he’s supposed to be such a great strategist, were him trying to sabotage his own invasion without being really obvious about it because he was in a bad position but the last thing he wanted was for Thanos to be successful in using him that way. But I will be reasonably content if we’re at least allowed to retain that interpretation if we want to.

Reblogged: coneycat

Posted: 9:01 PM
Understood ?

No, because Thanos. (Tom compared Loki’s experiences in the void to being kidnapped by terrorists, for instance.)

(Source: lokihiddleston)

Reblogged: spurlunk

Posted: 7:41 PM

Reblogged: icy-mischief

Posted: 6:15 PM
Posted: 6:15 PM
Soooo, folklore people…this isn’t a fairy ring but it has to mean SOMETHING, right?

Soooo, folklore people…this isn’t a fairy ring but it has to mean SOMETHING, right?

Posted: 5:04 PM
I actually said “awww” out loud in Target. WEREWOLF SISTERS.

I actually said “awww” out loud in Target. WEREWOLF SISTERS.

Posted: 4:49 PM
enigmarr:

I was adopted and my dad’s a dick monthly meetup
"-turns me into a cyborg, and calls Gamora his favourite daughter right in front of me!”
"Yeah? First Odin starts a war with a race he graciously failed to mention I was a part of, then banishes me when I try to finish it! Have you ever been to Earth? It’s hellish!”
As requested by just-tinabow-man :3

enigmarr:

I was adopted and my dad’s a dick monthly meetup

"-turns me into a cyborg, and calls Gamora his favourite daughter right in front of me!”

"Yeah? First Odin starts a war with a race he graciously failed to mention I was a part of, then banishes me when I try to finish it! Have you ever been to Earth? It’s hellish!”

As requested by just-tinabow-man :3

Reblogged: mikkeneko

Posted: 3:47 PM
no it’s awful I’m so charmed

no it’s awful I’m so charmed

Posted: 3:46 PM
Awww yay Black Widow poster at Michael’s :3

Awww yay Black Widow poster at Michael’s :3

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh